Tag Archives: FHO surgery

Foster Mischief


We love getting updates from our foster dogs’ new forever families! Seeing dogs plucked from the county shelter only to go on to wonderful homes where they are showered in love is worth all the craziness we go through. Check out our before, foster and forever photos from our last three foster dogs below!

Sony/Nietzsche

shelter pup

Sony’s (now Nietzsche’s) shelter photo from Miami-Dade Animal Services, 3/2/12

loveofmydogs, loveofmydogs.com

Nietzsche (with Harley) in foster, 3/10/12

Nietzsche’s favorite mischief: ‘slithering’ up people to get lots of kisses and loves!

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Feelin’ the Love


It’s been two weeks since Scarlett’s FHO surgery and she is recovering slowly but surely. Yesterday, we took her back to the vet to get her stitches out and though the wound is healing and her personality is back to normal, the recovery is just starting. After continuing to hobble on three legs for a week and a half despite daily stretches, exercises and walks through tall grass, we decided we needed to stricter plan to get her using her leg.

dog, dog surgery

“I only have three legs.”

Along with constantly saying, “use your leg, Scarlett”, we implemented a new exercise that somewhat forces her to put weight on the leg. While she stands with the right leg dangling at her side, we take it and gently move it forward and properly touching the ground, instead of dangling beside it. The key is putting it in front of her back left leg. Then we lead her forward and she puts weight down because she needs to move her back left leg first to walk– moving the right one forward again is awkward and since her back legs are not parallel, she can’t hobble easily from the position.

dog

Pushing her leg forward.

dog walking after leg surgery, dog

The position forces her to put pressure on the leg when walking forward.

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Awards for Scarlett


Our big girl, Scarlett, had FHO hip surgery last Friday and is currently on the mend. Though it has not been easy, we can see she is improving little by little and she remains strong despite a semi grouchy attitude.

Unlike the puppies who had FHO surgery, Scarlett is full-grown and 51 lbs. She still refuses to put any weight on her right leg at all and instead hobbles around on three legs. We can tell she is getting better: in the beginning of the week, she held her leg all the way up. Now, she lets it dangle, touching the ground but not applying any pressure.

dog after surgery

You can see here how she stands. This was taken 6 days after FHO surgery.

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Scarlett Comes Home


This morning, we brought Scarlett home from FHO surgery. We are so happy to have her back– even though she is acting a bit crabby and dramatic, we’re blaming it on the meds. Scarlett’s surgeon told us her leg was much worse than he thought and prepared us for a long road of recovery. First though, our princess gets to relax– for a whole week!

dog after leg surgery

One day after surgery. Still feeling those strong pain meds & not too happy.

In FHO surgery, they shave off the “head” and “neck” of the leg bone- where the leg connects with the pelvis- and put the leg back into the correct position. Instead of replacing the head of the leg bone, it is left to strengthen and develop scar tissue and muscle that acts as a replacement. Depending on size, age and physical rehabilitation, dogs can recover 60-95% (and currently, Bethany is showing us that percentage may be 100%!).

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Scarlett’s FHO Surgery


dogs, cute, terrier

Happy girl, Scarlett

This Friday, June 1st, our Vizsla/Terrier mix Scarlett will have FHO surgery to repair a previous injury: a broken, dislocated, incorrectly healed leg and hip. When we adopted her a year ago, abused and malnourished, we were unaware of the injury. Scarlett was emaciated at 28 lbs, Distemper positive, teeth falling out and cuts and sores all over. Her leg injury went unnoticed by the shelter staff, us and her veterinarians– she walked normally and nothing looked suspicious. She was already 10 months old; most likely this injury happened months before she came to the shelter.

Scarlett’s intake picture from Miami-Dade Animal Services.

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